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Call for Papers2019-02-07T19:25:36+00:00

GKA TECHNO 2019 Madrid

Key Dates

Congress: October 3-4, 2019

CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE
1st CFP until January 21, 2019
2nd CFP until March 20, 2019
3rd CFP until June 20, 2019
FINAL CFP until August 20, 2019
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Super Discount Rate until February 4, 2019
Early Rate until April 3, 2019
Standard Rate until July 3, 2019
Final Rate until September 3, 2019

Highlighted Theme

When technology is the problem: techno-social innovations to favor social inclusion

Today, social life is such that the realization of simple daily tasks forces us to relate to technological devices. But when the characteristics of these devices do not adapt adequately to our functional needs, the relationship becomes problematic. It is affected by the presence of gaps or barriers, of very different typology depending on the characteristics in conflict.

Reflecting critically and constructively on such barriers offers us numerous advantages. Perhaps the most remarkable is the possibility of implementing the opportune facilitators that lead to the development of more inclusive technologies. At present, however, in addition to information and communication technologies (the familiar ICT), we must incorporate new elements into reflection, such as the robotic devices that are increasingly being introduced in our closest spaces and of coexistence.

Eliminating technological barriers implies innovation processes that may come from particular users, from communities or from the developers themselves, and bring about social innovations, community innovations or simply instrumental innovations. In this sense, innovative ideas such as accessibility and universal design have long been established in the conceptual and practical wealth of users and developers.

The implementation of the appropriate facilitators and innovations also promotes technological appropriation and favors the participation of all people in the social environments to which the technologies give access. Reflecting on technological barriers thus acquires an ethical, social and political character, which implies the ideas of justice, rights and equal opportunities. Consequently, the main objective of critical and reflective knowledge about the technological framework in which we currently operate should not be other than to pave the way towards better, more respectful and inclusive societies for all people.

Tema destacado 2018

When technology is the problem: techno-social innovations to favor social inclusion

Today, social life is such that the realization of simple daily tasks forces us to relate to technological devices. But when the characteristics of these devices do not adapt adequately to our functional needs, the relationship becomes problematic. It is affected by the presence of gaps or barriers, of very different typology depending on the characteristics in conflict.

Reflecting critically and constructively on such barriers offers us numerous advantages. Perhaps the most remarkable is the possibility of implementing the opportune facilitators that lead to the development of more inclusive technologies. At present, however, in addition to information and communication technologies (the familiar ICT), we must incorporate new elements into reflection, such as the robotic devices that are increasingly being introduced in our closest spaces and of coexistence.

Eliminating technological barriers implies innovation processes that may come from particular users, from communities or from the developers themselves, and bring about social innovations, community innovations or simply instrumental innovations. In this sense, innovative ideas such as accessibility and universal design have long been established in the conceptual and practical wealth of users and developers.

The implementation of the appropriate facilitators and innovations also promotes technological appropriation and favors the participation of all people in the social environments to which the technologies give access. Reflecting on technological barriers thus acquires an ethical, social and political character, which implies the ideas of justice, rights and equal opportunities. Consequently, the main objective of critical and reflective knowledge about the technological framework in which we currently operate should not be other than to pave the way towards better, more respectful and inclusive societies for all people.

Other themes

Science and Society

  • Science policies. Science governance.
  • Science, management, and innovation.
  • Science and values. The ‘ethos’ of science.
  • Biotechnology. Bioethics. Biopolitics.
  • Sociology of science. STS studies.
  • Science and culture.
  • Science and gender studies.
  • Science communication. Scientific journalism.
  • Public understanding of science.
  • Scholarly communication. Open data. Open access.
  • History and philosophy of science.
  • History and philosophy of physics.
  • History and philosophy of chemistry.
  • History and philosophy of biology.
  • History and philosophy of mathematics.
  • Sustainable energy. Environment. Ecology.
  • Science and religion.

Technology and Society

  • Technology policies. Technological governance.
  • Technological innovation. Inventions. Patents.
  • History of technology. Philosophy of technology.
  • Virtual communities. Communities of practice.
  • Digital divide. Technology and identity. Technology and (functional) diversity.
  • Technology and gender.
  • E-government. E-democracy. Participatory systems.
  • Big data. Privacy. Surveillance.
  • Mass media. Culture industry.
  • Technology and globalization. Technology and power.
  • Technological progress and sustainability.
  • Technology and global warming.
  • Technological determinism. Autonomous technology.
  • Sociology of technology. Social construction of technology.
  • Minds and machines. Transhumanism. Posthumanism. Extended mind.
  • Artificial Intelligence. The sciences of the artificial.

Science, Technology and Innovation

  • The knowledge society. Information and communication technologies.
  • Knowledge management and information systems. Business intelligence tools.
  • Open innovation. Distruibuted innovation. User innovation.
  • Sharing economy. Commons. Crowdsourcing. Collective intelligence.
  • Technological and organizational innovations.
  • Technology and busniess administration.
  • Proprietary software. Patents. Intellectual property. Copyright.
  • Open source software. Free software. Open licences. Creative Commons.
  • Open data. Open access. Open archives. Public sector information.
  • Big science. Research infrastructures. Information architecture. Technoscience.
  • Little science. Scientometrics. Scholarly communication.
  • The values of precision. Standardization. Reusability.
  • Cultural industry. Military industry. Pharmaceutical industry.
  • Converging technologies. Nano-Bio-Info-Cogno (NBIC).
  • Research and Development (R&D) policies and strategies.
  • Start-ups. Spin-offs. University research parks.
  • Business cluster. Smart cities.
  • E-commerce. E-business.
  • Technologies of the future (energy, transport, nanotechnology, genome editing, quantum computing…).

Science, Technology and Learning

  • E-learning. Blended learning.
  • Assessment and evaluation tools.
  • Gamification in education.
  • Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC).
  • Online universities. Distance education.
  • Virtual communities. Communities of practice.
  • Digital divide and continuing education. Lifelong learning.
  • Collaborative learning.
  • Multiliteracies. Multimodal literacy.
  • Learning science (physics, chemistry, biology).
  • Learning mathematics. Pedagogy of mathematics.
  • Learning technology. Learning by doing.
  • Learning and natural environment.
  • Extended cognition. Collective intelligence.
  • Technological usability. Human-computer interaction. Interfaces.

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